Image, thought, and the making of social worlds
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Wengrow, David (Ed.): Image, thought, and the making of social worlds, Heidelberg: Propylaeum, 2022 (Freiburger Studien zur Archäologie und visuellen Kultur, Vol. 3). https://doi.org/10.11588/propylaeum.842

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ISBN 978-3-96929-040-8 (PDF)
ISBN 978-3-96929-041-5 (Hardcover)

Published 11.05.2022.

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David Wengrow (Ed.)

Image, thought, and the making of social worlds

Freiburger Studien zur Archäologie und visuellen Kultur

What is the status and role of image systems in human culture and history? This volume presents original studies examining the complex interplay between images, thought processes, and the making of social worlds from the pre-Columbian Americas to the ancient Mediterranean and early China. Moving beyond a notion of images as “merely illustrative” of propositions expressed in language or writing these studies draw insights from the civilisations of Amazonia, Oceania, and Central Africa to reveal the autonomy of image systems as intellectual devices in their own right, and their enduring role in the development of human societies across the traditional divide of “oral” and “literate” cultures.

David Wengrow is professor of comparative archaeology at the Institute of Archaeology, University College London. He has written widely on the role of images in relation to human cognition and culture, with a particular focus on the early societies of North-East Africa and the Middle East.

Contents
PDF
Titelei
Ralf von den Hoff, Christoph Huth
Contents
Susanne Küchler
Els Lagrou
Patterns and relational thinking in Amazonia
Paul Pettitt
Exploring the nature of the earliest visual cultures of African and Near Eastern Homo sapiens and Eurasian Neanderthals
Carl Knappett
Perspectives from Aegean Bronze Age art
Jeffrey Quilter
Carlo Severi
Chimeras, pictographs, and writings in the Native American arts of memory
Gebhard J. Selz
Advocating a non-logocentric view on the evolution of cuneiform writing
Flavia Carraro
Reflections on the textility of writing and ‘entextileization’
Bérénice Gaillemin
Sensitive writing and scriptural landscape (Bolivia, 21st century)
Stephen Houston
Notes on Contributors