Eva Cichy

Der Siedlungsplatz Hamm-Westhafen
Teil II: Katalog und Tafeln

Bodenaltertümer Westfalens, Vol. 46.2

In the area of the western harbor of Hamm, traces from the pre-Roman Iron Age, the Roman Imperial Period and the Early Middle Ages were uncovered on an area of 4.2 ha. However, the outstanding significance of the excavation results from the high medieval settlement findings. Not only does the main building of the farmstead reach a length of more than 35 m – an outstanding size compared to the mass of contemporary houses –, but also the outbuildings, cellars and wells have dimensions that go far exceed the usual peasant needs. The find material confirms this impressively. The farm must have had a crucial importance in its region. Supra-regional comparisons suggest that the complex was used as an Ober- or Meierhof. Nevertheless, there are no indications for a transition to a noble estate.
The thesis was accepted as a dissertation at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum in 2005.

 

Eva Cichy

Der Siedlungsplatz Hamm-Westhafen
Teil I: Text

Bodenaltertümer Westfalens, Vol. 46.1

In the area of the western harbor of Hamm, traces from the pre-Roman Iron Age, the Roman Imperial Period and the Early Middle Ages were uncovered on an area of 4.2 ha. However, the outstanding significance of the excavation results from the high medieval settlement findings. Not only does the main building of the farmstead reach a length of more than 35 m – an outstanding size compared to the mass of contemporary houses –, but also the outbuildings, cellars and wells have dimensions that go far exceed the usual peasant needs. The find material confirms this impressively. The farm must have had a crucial importance in its region. Supra-regional comparisons suggest that the complex was used as an Ober- or Meierhof. Nevertheless, there are no indications for a transition to a noble estate.
The thesis was accepted as a dissertation at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum in 2005.

 

Ulrich Hofstätter, Andrea Schmölder-Veit, Nele Schröder-Griebel (Eds.)

Das antike Olympia in München
1972–2022

On the 50th anniversary of the 1972 Munich Summer Olympic Games, the Classical Plaster Cast Collection is taking the opportunity to revive the special exhibition “100 Years of German Research at Olympia”, which was on display at the Deutsches Museum at the time of the games. This book is dedicated to that exhibition and its prized objects, such as the reconstruction of the western pediment of the Zeus temple including its architectural frame. Other focal points are the history of the sanctuary, the ancient Olympic Games and the scientific exploration of Olympia with special reference to the casts. Additionally, new scientific and educational approaches based on 3D scans and 3D prints are presented.

David Wengrow (Ed.)

Image, thought, and the making of social worlds

Freiburger Studien zur Archäologie und visuellen Kultur , Vol. 3

What is the status and role of image systems in human culture and history? This volume presents original studies examining the complex interplay between images, thought processes, and the making of social worlds from the pre-Columbian Americas to the ancient Mediterranean and early China. Moving beyond a notion of images as “merely illustrative” of propositions expressed in language or writing these studies draw insights from the civilisations of Amazonia, Oceania, and Central Africa to reveal the autonomy of image systems as intellectual devices in their own right, and their enduring role in the development of human societies across the traditional divide of “oral” and “literate” cultures.

Mechthild Schulze-Dörrlamm

Die Einwanderung von Angelsachsen ins Frankenreich aus archäologischer Sicht.
Zu den Spuren der »angelsächsischen Mission« im ausgehenden 7. bis mittleren 9. Jahrhundert

Monographien des RGZM, Vol. 158

The 8th century was the peak of an intellectual movement that had led many highly educated men as well as some women from Anglo-Saxons to emigrate to the continent. Their aim was to win the pagan population - especially Frisians and the tribally related Old Saxons - for Christianity or to improve their religious education. Especially in the northern and eastern Frankish Empire, they worked throughout their lives as missionaries, priests, monks and nuns, teachers or instructresses, and sometimes also as scholars. Only a few of the participants in the "Anglo-Saxon mission" are generally known today, e.g. Archbishop Boniface, who was murdered in Friesland, and the missionary Willibrord of Echternach, because until now it has been almost impossible to obtain a comprehensive picture of this group of people.
In this richly illustrated book, 70 men and 15 women who can be proved to have immigrated from Anglo-Saxons are presented for the first time with their names and dates of life. It also contains floor plans of the churches and monasteries they founded, shows the objects from their possessions that still exist today and documents their graves as well as the unique Boniface tomb in Mainz. Five new distribution maps show not only the location of the immigrants' places of activity and burial places, but also the present-day repositories of works of Anglo-Saxon art and crafts as well as the sites of archaeological objects of Anglo-Saxon origin in the Frankish Empire.

Jochen Sauer (Ed.)

Lateinische Grammatik unterrichten
analog und digital in Theorie und Praxis

Acta Didactica – Bielefelder Beiträge zur Didaktik der Alten Sprachen in Schule und Universität, Vol. 3

The teaching of Latin grammar in the classroom claims to achieve several goals: supporting language acquisition and being sensitive to inclusion. Teaching grammar should be successful in digital settings as in face-to-face teaching. The following questions have been raised recently: What is an adequate syllabus? Which are the criteria for a reasonable selection? Choosing the suitable introductory method (inductive / deductive) is always important to consider. The articles in this volume address the challenges mentioned and show ways in which Latin grammar can be taught in an effective and motivating manner. These challenges do not only apply to face-to-face teaching, but also to remote learning.

Nicholas J. Conard et al. (Eds.)

The Homotherium Finds from Schöningen 13II-4
Man and Big Cats of the Ice Age. Contributions of the scientific workshop at the paläon (Schöningen) from 05.06 to 07.06.2015

Forschungen zur Urgeschichte aus dem Tagebau Schöningen, Vol. 4

Big cats, including sabre-toothed cats, are for many people the symbol of a dangerous predator. In 2012, the first remains of the European sabre-toothed cats were discovered at the approximately 300,000 year old site of Schöningen, famous for mankind’s oldest wooden weapons. As a result of this discovery, a two-day scientific workshop was held in Schöningen in 2015 titled »The Homotherium finds from Schöningen 13II-4 and big cats of the Ice Age«. This volume is based on the lectures of this workshop and presents an overview of a topic that is crucial for human development, our coexistence with big cats. The aim of this volume is to address the various topics surrounding the European sabre-toothed cat. This includes the circumstances of their extinction, comparisons to extant big cats and their relationship to past humans.

Andrea Sinclair

Outlooks on the International Koiné Style
Hybrid Visual Idiom from New Kingdom Elite Iconography

Ägyptologische Studien Leipzig, Vol. 3

The Near Eastern Late Bronze Age is known for heightened political and economic interconnectivity as kings of wealthy states like Egypt and Hatti competed in the pursuit of valuable commodities, raw materials and technologies. An outcome of this interaction is argued to be the creation of a shared elite visual culture, an idiom of kingship, that has been called the ‘International Style’ in scholarship. This dissertation critiques the model and investigates evidence for this so-called style from Egypt, in particular addressing artefacts from the tomb of Tutankhamen that have been associated with this style in the past. It challenges the model for a shared idiom of kingship from Egypt and instead proposes an internal value within 18th royal rhetoric.

Heiko Steuer, Ulrich Zimmermann (Eds.)

Montanarchäologie in Europa
Berichte zum Internationalen Kolloquium »Frühe Erzgewinnung und Verhüttung in Europa« in Freiburg im Breisgau vom 4. bis 7. Oktober 1990

Archäologie und Geschichte – Freiburger Forschungen zum ersten Jahrtausend in Südwestdeutschland, Vol. 4

Based on the papers presented at an international and interdisciplinary symposium (October 1990) in Freiburg/Br., this volume offers an overview of the latest montanarchaeological investigations in almost all of Europe. The more than 40 contributions span the time from prehistoric to early modern mining. The mining of gold and silver, of non-ferrous metals as well as of iron is taken into account, whereby the path from ore mining via smelting to the further processing of the raw metals is shown and keywords such as working conditions and environmental influences indicate the thematic diversity of the volume. The book, which is equipped with an extensive index of locations and more than 300 illustrations, vividly illustrates the research approaches, methods and previous results of mining archaeology.

Kristina Nowak-Klimscha

Die früh- bis hochmittelalterliche Wüstung Twesine im Hochsauerlandkreis
Siedlungsentwicklung an der Grenze zum Frankenreich

Bodenaltertümer Westfalens, Vol. 54

The early to high medieval deserted village of Twesine is situated at the foot of the mountain plateau of Eresburg Castle – today's Obermarsberg. Twesine has a special significance for the history of Westphalia, as early relics of copper smelting were discovered here. The waste products of copper and iron extraction are found in Twesine in a dump up to 60 cm high and 3000 m2 in size. They bear witness to all stages of metal processing for which the deposits at Obermarsberg were exploited. Kristina Nowak-Klimscha investigates whether the settlement and the wide-ranging metallurgical knowledge available here, together with Eresburg Castle, became a pawn in Charlemagne's power and economic-political interests during the Saxon Wars.
This thesis was accepted as a dissertation at the Ruhr-Universität Bochum in 2014.

Hans Ulrich Nuber, Karl Schmid, Heiko Steuer, Thomas Zotz (Eds.)

Archäologie und Geschichte des ersten Jahrtausends in Südwestdeutschland

Archäologie und Geschichte – Freiburger Forschungen zum ersten Jahrtausend in Südwestdeutschland, Vol. 1

The research association "Archäologie und Geschichte des ersten Jahrtausends in Südwestdeutschland", founded in 1984, has set itself the goal of exploring the early history of the German southwest in an interdisciplinary conversation. The first volume of the series of the same name contains 15 contributions by renowned historians who present the latest results of research from their fields of activity - provincial Roman and early historical archaeology and medieval regional history. The geographical focus of the investigations is the area between the upper Rhine and the upper Danube, between the Swiss Jura and the Swabian Alb, the Burgundian Gate and the Franconian Ries. The time span ranges from the Celtic period and the Roman occupation of the country to the era of the formation of high medieval noble houses and sovereign territories. The research association pays special attention to periods of upheaval in history, the change of populations and the transformation of social and economic structures as well as the introduction of technical innovations. The book, which is equipped with an extensive index and many illustrations, provides a clear introduction to the methodology and working methods of ancient history. It is therefore an indispensable compendium for students and scholars, but also for the layman interested in regional studies.

Ute Kelp, Wolf-Rüdiger Teegen (Eds.)

Wealthy and Healthy? Methodological Approaches to Non-Élite Burials
Panel 1.2

Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World – Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Cologne/Bonn 2018, Vol. 1

The analysis of ancient societies beyond the political system, leading actors, and élite groups relies heavily on the archaeological record. Abundantly preserved burial sites present a major part of ancient testimonies. Yet, neither are burials with their grave goods a mirror of past lives nor do non-élite burials necessarily equal poor burials, and we need a mixture of criteria to identify non-élite as well as non-poor burials. The bones of the deceased are, however, first class bio-historical sources. There is a strong correlation between wealth and health in antiquity and human remains reflect the social status via diet and health.

With respect to various methodological approaches to funerary archaeology linking the capacities of material culture studies to social and natural sciences, the contributions in this volume explore the relationship between material culture, health and social status. They evaluate non-élite burials regarding the social persona and life style of the deceased as much as the ideology of the descendants expressing their beliefs through the burial process. Precisely the focus on context analysis – aiming beyond the funerary sphere – constitutes the importance of the case studies united in this volume.

Matylda Gierszewska-Noszczyńsk, Lutz Grunwald (Eds.)

Zwischen Machtzentren und Produktionsorten
Wirtschaftsaspekte von der römischen Epoche bis in das Hochmittelalter am Rhein und in seinen Nachbarregionen

RGZM – Tagungen, Vol. 45

On 12 November 2018, a cooperation agreement was signed in Ingelheim am Rhein between the Kaiserpfalz Research Centre based there and the Roman-Germanic Central Museum, Leibniz Research Institute for Archaeology. With this agreement, the close ties that have existed since the middle of the 19th century between the scientists in Mainz and the researchers of the Imperial Palace in Ingelheim were confirmed in writing. The future cooperation will focus particularly on European economic aspects and topics of supra-regional materials research. The first fruits of this cooperation were presented at interdisciplinary conferences on 12 and 13 November 2018 in Ingelheim and on 28 and 29 November 2019 in Mayen. These events also served as an intensive exchange with scientists from Germany and abroad. The results of both conferences are brought together in this conference volume. In 25 papers, the fundamentals of trade in the Rhineland and its neighbouring regions as well as the processes of the exchange of goods between centres of power, rural regions and production sites in the period from the Roman era to the High Middle Ages are examined from very different perspectives. Both for the large-scale development tendencies and the relationships between different economic regions as well as for the production sites and the marketing routes, the contributions offer trend-setting explanations, fundamental presentations and exceptional descriptions. They form the basis for future research in parts of Europe adjacent to the Rhineland, which is planned within the framework of the cooperation and will be reflected in further conferences.

Johannes Preiser-Kapeller, Taxiarchis G. Kolias, Falko Daim (Eds.)

Seasides of Byzantium
Harbours and Anchorages of a Mediterranean Empire

Byzanz zwischen Orient und Okzident, Vol. 21

In recent years, interest in the study of maritime installations and networks in the Roman and Byzantine Mediterranean has increased considerably, as documented by various projects and publications.
The conference »Seasides of Byzantium. Harbours and Anchorages of a Mediterranean Empire«, from which the papers collected in the present volume emerged, took place in Athens in 2017 as part of a cooperation between the DFG-funded Special Research Programme (SPP 1630) »Harbours from the Roman Period to the Middle Ages« and the National Hellenic Research Foundation. It united historians, archaeologists and geoarchaeologists to explore harbours and anchorages as core maritime infrastructure to the Late Roman and Byzantine Empire.
General phenomena such as the organisation of the Byzantine navy and its operations or lighthouses are discussed in this volume as well as new geoarchaeological research methodologies in harbour archaeology. Most contributions in the present volume examine case studies for the most important maritime core region of the Byzantine Empire, the Aegean. This sea connected the remaining provinces of the empire in Southeastern Europe and Asia Minor after the loss of Syria, Palestine, Egypt, and North Africa to the Arabs in the 7th century AD. In addition to technical and geographical aspect, the studies in this volume make clear that we need to explore more and more the social embedding of the seasides of Byzantium to understand their dynamics in all their complexity.

Friderike Senkbeil

Tacitus und Rom
Die urbs Roma als Raum der erzählten Welt in den Historien und Annalen

This research examines the literary representation of Rome and its urban spaces in the two historiographical works of Tacitus. In particular, the investigation focuses on how Tacitus perceives, presents, connotes and functionalizes the city, its urban spaces and topographies which among others implies questions about thematic, symbolic, characterizing or psychologizing functions that can be identified in the text.
The aim of this thesis is to elucidate the specific Tacitean representation of the urbs Roma in comparison to other literary representations and the material Rome of the Tacitean age which as part of a specific construction of past and memory reflects a subjective “Romerlebnis” that exemplifies important aspects of former values and norms.

Max Engel, Friederike Stock, Helmut Brückner (Eds.)

Coastal Geoarchaeology in the Mediterranean – on the Interdependence of Landscape Dynamics, Harbour Installations and Economic Prosperity in the Littoral Realm
Panel 2.3

Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World – Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Cologne/Bonn 2018, Vol. 5

Mediterranean coastlines are highly dynamic landscapes, shifting up to tens of kilometres during the last ca. six millennia in the case of prograding delta plains. In these low-lying coastal environments, many ancient harbour installations became landlocked with severe impacts on the political and economic situation as well as the status of urban centres and their hinterland. At the same time, rising relative sea levels may have resulted in the salinization of aquifers and adverse effects on agricultural production. This collection of papers from Panel 2.3 “Coastal geoarchaeology in the Mediterranean – on the interdependence of landscape dynamics, harbour installations and economic prosperity in the littoral realm” covers those topics for different parts of the Mediterranean geographical entity over the last 2500 years. These studies successfully demonstrate how geoscience data either help to locate harbour sites or how they support the interpretation of archaeological remains and literature sources of ancient authors. Each contribution therefore represents a striking example for the relevance of interdisciplinary approaches in archaeology, as summarized in the concept of geoarchaeology. 

Claus-Joachim Kind (Ed.)

Löwenmensch und mehr
Die Ausgrabungen 2008–2013 in den altsteinzeitlichen Schichten der Stadel-Höhle im Hohlenstein (Lonetal), Gemeinde Asselfingen, Alb-Donau-Kreis

Forschungen und Berichte zur Archäologie in Baden-Württemberg, Vol. 15

The Hohlenstein in the Lone Valley (Gem. Asselfingen, Alb-Donau-Kreis) is one of the most important Palaeolithic sites in southern Germany. It became famous in particular for the “Lion Man”, found in 1935 – a unique mammoth ivory carving depicting a hybrid creature from the early Upper Palaeolithic period about 35,000 to 40,000 years ago. The Hohlenstein belongs to a group of caves in the Swabian Alb that have yielded the oldest known evidence of figurative art in the entire history of mankind, and for this reason became UNESCO World Heritage Sites in 2017.

Since the current state of preservation of the layers in the cave was largely unknown, new excavations were carried out between 2008 and 2013 by the State Office for Cultural Heritage Preservation in the Regional Council of Stuttgart. It turned out that both inside the cave and on its forecourt there were still intact layers containing finds. Surprisingly, also new fragments of the Lion Man figure came to light.

Francesco D'Andria, Grazia Semeraro (Eds.)

Messapia: Economy and Exchanges in the Land between Ionian and Adriatic Sea
Panel 3.9

Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World – Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Cologne/Bonn 2018, Vol. 12

Ever since the Bronze Age, the geographical position of Messapia, between the Ionian and Adriatic seas,  has enabled the development of relations characterised by continuity within the framework of mobility in the Mediterranean. This volume focuses on certain aspects of the economy in Messapia, with particular reference to bio-archaeological themes (including livestock rearing and the consumption of animal resources), textile production (applying archaeometric methods to residues of fabric) and imports of luxury products from Greek cities and the Greek colonies of southern Italy. The presence in grave goods of imported prestige items has been investigated with reference to the forms of self-representation adopted by the Messapian aristocracy in both funerary rituals and manifestations of power within the settlements. The variety of religious manifestations in the Messapian world constitutes a particular case study linked to cultural exchanges, which, thanks to the recent discoveries of places of worship, can now be investigated in detail. Important in this regard are the discoveries made in Castro, where the Athenaion – linked to the myth of Aeneas’s first landing on the shores of Italy – was identified.

Institute of Philosophy, Prag and Jan Bažant

Statues of Venus
From Antiquity to the Present

The goal of this book has been to explore the statues of Venus. Over the centuries, they have come closer to or farther away from what real women look like. From antiquity until the 21st century, sculptors have oscillated between the ideal (and therefore insipid) beauty characterizing the goddess and the seductive shapes of the body of a living woman, which for various reasons could never fully prevail. In antiquity, this was prevented by the fact that the statue depicted a goddess; in post-ancient Europe, it was primarily due to the taboo of depicting female nudity. Venus could have been depicted as a naked woman with all the racy details, but the viewer would hardly take such a depiction seriously. The artist could have eliminated attractive references to the female body from her portrayal, but how would the viewer be expected to believe that she represents Venus, the mother of Amor?

Caterina Parigi (Ed.)

Recycling and Reuse of Sculpture in Roman and Late Antique Times
Panel 6.8

Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World – Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Cologne/Bonn 2018, Vol. 37

Recycling and reuse of sculpture was a common practice in the ancient world, which took a variety of forms in different periods and places.
The volume stresses two main aspects in relationship to this practice, namely the reuse of sculptures and their parts as building material on the one hand and in their original function or as works of art on the other hand.
The reuse of sculpture has a number of socio-economical aspects. As the economic factor always plays an important role in recycling, it must always be taken into account. It is also important to remember the difficulty to purchase new sculptures in Late Antiquity. However, reuse and recycling are complex processes, which do not have a single cause and not only occur in Late Antiquity. The reuse of statues may also have had an aesthetic value and been seen as a reminder of former times of glory.
This volume focuses on the Roman and Late Antique periods, aiming to show the continuity and the complexity of the phenomenon. Through the comparison of different case studies in varying contexts, the papers highlight the common features and local singularities of this practice.