Local Styles or Common Pattern Books in Roman Wall Painting and Mosaics
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Thomas, Renate (Ed.): Local Styles or Common Pattern Books in Roman Wall Painting and Mosaics: Panel 3.22, Heidelberg: Propylaeum, 2021 (Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World – Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Cologne/Bonn 2018, Vol. 22). https://doi.org/10.11588/propylaeum.777

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ISBN 978-3-96929-013-2 (PDF)
ISBN 978-3-96929-014-9 (Softcover)

Published 24.03.2021.

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Renate Thomas (Ed.)

Local Styles or Common Pattern Books in Roman Wall Painting and Mosaics

Panel 3.22

Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World – Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Cologne/Bonn 2018

The presentations of the panel "Local styles or common pattern books in Roman mural painting and mosaics" illustrated various aspects of the working methods of ancient workshops and their production. I. Bragantini used the example of the wall paintings in Cartagena and Lyon to emphasise these were made by Italian workshops that in her opinion. While St. Falzone, M. Marano and P. Tomassini focused on the characteristics of the local style in wall painting in Ostia, C. Sbrolli concentrated on the iconographic characteristics of the 'Workshop of the Vetti' in Pompeii. E. Moormann and D. Esposito investigated the question of whether the development of wall painting in Flavian times testified to continuity or a new impulse. C. Boschetti et al. highlighted the differences in the production of mosaics in Aquileia between the Augustan period and the 4th century AD: while the first workshops worked with high quality materials from Campania and probably came from there, the later mosaicists were probably local, as they used cheap materials available locally. B. Tober pointed out that there was an 'international' agreement on the manner of appointing certain room for certain functions. E. Aydogdu and A. Kazim Öz used a mosaic in Metropolis as an example to show that three-dimensional leaf patterns are also based on models that go back to geometric forms.

 

Renate Thomas, honorary Professor of Classical Archaeology at the Archaeological Institute of the University of Cologne, researching and teaching on wall painting and ancient sculpture since 1982.