The Production of Military Equipment – Fabricae, Private Production and More
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Hoss, Stefanie (Ed.): The Production of Military Equipment – Fabricae, Private Production and More: Panel 9.1, Heidelberg: Propylaeum, 2021 (Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World – Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Cologne/Bonn 2018, Vol. 48). https://doi.org/10.11588/propylaeum.761

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ISBN 978-3-96929-009-5 (PDF)
ISBN 978-3-96929-010-1 (Softcover)

Published 08.12.2021.

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Stefanie Hoss (Ed.)

The Production of Military Equipment – Fabricae, Private Production and More

Panel 9.1

Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World – Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Cologne/Bonn 2018

The production of military equipment is a subject that is much more complicated than often thought as Roman soldiers were not completely equipped by the state in an uniform manner. While a certain amount of ‘near-uniformity’ was necessary in the army, it was logistically impossible to ensure complete uniformity, even within a single unit. One reason for this was that Roman soldiers owned most of the equipment themselves, which allowed them to choose their own preferences (within limits).

After an introduction and overview of the subject, the three case studies look at what the tools found in a fort can say about the production of military equipment on the site, at the influence of workshop traditions on the making of mail armour and at whether state control or local production was the main impetus in the production of crossbow brooches.

Stefanie Hoss is a metal and glass finds specialist working in the Netherlands and teaching at the University of Cologne. Her research focuses on the material remains of social habits including the Roman army, Roman small finds, and the wondrous ways of Roman refuse.