Pre-modern Industrial Districts
How to cite this title

Herdick, Michael , Hunold, Angelika and Schaaff, Holger (Eds.): Pre-modern Industrial Districts: Panel 3.12, Heidelberg: Propylaeum, 2020 (Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World – Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Cologne/Bonn 2018, Vol. 14). https://doi.org/10.11588/propylaeum.726

More citation styles
Licenses

This work is licensed under a Creative Commons License 4.0
(CC BY-SA 4.0)
.
Creative Commons License BY-SA 4.0

Identifiers
ISBN 978-3-948465-84-1 (PDF)
ISBN 978-3-948465-85-8 (Softcover)

Published 29.10.2020.

Statistics


Michael Herdick , Angelika Hunold , Holger Schaaff (Eds.)

Pre-modern Industrial Districts

Panel 3.12

Archaeology and Economy in the Ancient World – Proceedings of the 19th International Congress of Classical Archaeology, Cologne/Bonn 2018

The ancient quarrying and mining district of the Eastern Eifel has been the subject of research by the Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum (RGZM) in Mainz and Mayen since 1997. The products – primarily basalt lava millstones, tuffstone building material, and pottery – were extensively traded throughout much of Europe for many centuries.

An extensive research programme was launched to examine the wealth of evidence about the ancient stone industry in the region and its significance for the political establishment of Rome north of the Alps. The main subjects were the basalt and tuff stone industries as well as the Mayen vicus, the most important economic centre. Another subject is the pottery production, which is researched by material studies as well as by experimental archaeology. Other studies deal with the preconditions for the economic success, focussing on the infrastructure and the rural settlement conditions.

Being an industrial district of supraregional importance, the quarrying and mining district of the Eastern Eifel turned out an excellent case study for the investigation of pre-modern industrial districts in general, providing a model for the study of ancient industries: these need to be investigated with a long-term view and with a holistic approach, taking into account economic, social and settlement aspects.

Michael Herdick is deputy head of the field of competence "Scientific and Experimental Archeology" and head of the Laboratory for Experimental Archaeology (LEA) of the Römisch-Germanisches Zentralmuseum Mainz (RGZM). His key areas of research are the archaeology of technology and of economies. 

Dr. Angelika Hunold is an archaeologist at the Department of Volcanology, Archaeology and history of Technonogly of the Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums, Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Archäologie in Mainz und Mayen and has been studying the pre-Modern industrial areas of Mayen since 1997, focussing on the development of the settlement in Late Antiquity.

Dr. Holger Schaaff is an archaeologist and head of the Department of Volcanology, Archaeology and history of Technonogly of the Römisch-Germanischen Zentralmuseums, Leibniz-Forschungsinstitut für Archäologie in Mainz und Mayen and has been studying pre-Modern the industrial areas of Mayen since 1997, focussing on the Tuff quarrying.

Contents
PDF
Titelei
Contents
Preface
Angelika Hunold, Holger Schaaff
The Ancient Quarrying and Mining District between the Eifel and the Rhine – a Summary of Research
Sibylle Friedrich
Pottery Production for the European Market – the Roman Potter’s Workshops of Weißenthurm
Lutz Grunwald
Pottery Production for the European Market – the Roman and Early Medieval Potter’s Workshops of Mayen
Gregor Döhner, Michael Herdick, Anna Axtmann
Technical-Historical Comparison of Pottery Districts: Desiderata and Experimental Archaeological
Stefan Wenzel
Transport of Heavy Loads on Inland Waterways